Creole Tomato and Basil Bruschetta Topping

I went to the Crescent City Farmers Market on Saturday and found some beautiful Creole tomatoes. These tomatoes have a wonderful taste because they are grown only in the River Parishes of Louisiana, so they don’t have to travel far from the field to reach my plate.

I used the new-to-me bread machine from Michelle’s mom to make the dough for some French bread. I relied on the recipe from the Fleischmann’s Bread World website. It wasn’t the prettiest loaf of bread I’ve ever made, so no pictures of it.

While the dough was rising, it was time to toss together diced tomatoes with some basil, olive oil and salt. For about two large tomatoes, you’ll need about a 1/4 cup of high quality olive oil, about 1/4 cup of fresh basil, cut in a chiffonade (stack the leaves, roll them like a cigar and slice thinly). Add in a few generous pinches of coarse sea salt like Fleur de Sel and a couple of grinds of black pepper. Stir and let sit for the flavors to come together.

I took the bread from the oven and, once it had cooled, I cut it into rounds. Those, I lightly brushed with olive oil and then toasted them on a grill pan (to make pretty grill marks). While still warm, I rubbed them with a raw clove of garlic. Then, I mounded on the tomato and basil mix and ate until I was fit to burst.

Oh, the taste of summer!

Cheesy Meatloaf

I love meatloaf – it is cheap, easy and any leftovers makes awesome sandwiches for the next several days. I’ve done meatloaf before (here and here) but this one uses lots of cheddar cheese to make the finished meatloaf even better.

I served it with a bacon, broccoli, cheese stuffed Vidalia onion but that recipe needs a lot more tweaking before I will post it.

Cheesy Meatloaf

3/4 cup milk
2-3 slices stale bread (at least 1 1/2 cups worth when torn)
1 medium onion, chopped
2 lbs ground beef
8 ounces cheddar cheese, grated
14.5 oz can diced tomatoes
1 egg, lightly beaten
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper

Make a panade by soaking the torn pieces of bread in the milk for ten minutes.

Sauté onion in a tablespoon of butter until softened, at least 5 minutes.

Combine panade, sautéed onions and all the rest of the ingredients together in a large bowl. Mix with your hands. Form into one large loaf or two smaller loaves and bake at 350 degrees F for 60 minutes (or until it reaches an internal temp of 160 degrees). Remove from the oven, slice and serve.